Tag Archives: pastel gems

December’s Pastel Choices

On this last day of 2014, I’m delighted to present my totally subjective pastel choices for December. As always, soooooooo difficult to choose. I sifted through all my choices seen throughout December over and over again, weeding one here, one there, until I had about 15 left. And then I was at the point when I didn’t think I could narrow my choices down any further.

But I promised.

10 only.

So I looked and looked and then looked some more and finally, I ended up with the 10 pastel choices that make my heartbeat quicken when I look at them.

Which one of the the 10 pastel choices does that for you??

 

Anita Stoll, "Bouquet in the Lotus Bowl," pastel on Mi-Tientes Touch board, 9 x 14 in

Anita Stoll, “Bouquet in the Lotus Bowl,” pastel on Mi-Tientes Touch board, 9 x 14 in

I’m drawn to this moody and deceptively simple pastel. It seems so unusual for a bouquet of flowers, coloured as it is with greys and blacks. I love that Anita has chosen to work in such muted colours. There is so little indicated in this evocative and illusive work and yet, we easily read a vase with flowers. Click here to see more of Anita’s work.

 

 

Bela Tarcsay, "In The Morning," pastel on paper, 13 3/4 x 19 5/8 in

Bela Tarcsay, “In The Morning,” pastel on paper, 13 3/4 x 19 5/8 in

Here we have the drama of sunlight streaming into a room, illuminating certain parts while some areas remain in deep shadow. I love the feeling, the energy conveyed by the pastel marks, the colours. Makes me want to rise and shine! I couldn’t find a website for Bela Tarcsay but you can see more of his work by clicking here.

 

 

Hamidreza Razavi, "Portrait," pastel on paper, 16 1/2  x 11 11/16 in

Hamidreza Razavi, “Portrait,” pastel on paper, 16 1/2 x 11 11/16 in

I think this is an amazingly powerful portrait. I love the directness of pastel application, the expressive use of line, the intensity in the eyes, the sculptural form, the tension revealed. Wonderful! There’s something about it that makes me think of the German Expressionist artists like Otto Dix. I couldn’t find a website for Hamidreza Razavi, but you can see more work on his facebook profile.

 

 

Motti Shoval, "Cafe Massada," pastel on paper, 25 5/8 x 19 11/16 in

Motti Shoval, “Cafe Massada,” pastel on paper, 25 5/8 x 19 11/16 in

There’s something about both the abstract design of this painting as well as the cafe setting that keeps pulling me back to it. There’s also the contrast between stillness and movement. No figures are shown yet their presence is hinted at in the car and by the chair in the foreground that looks as if it’s just been pushed away from the table. There’s also the dramatic contrast between light and dark, between colour and neutrals, between soft and hard edges. Apparently another artist without his own website, you can read Motti Shoval’s CV and see a few more pieces here. And you can find a link to his facebook page there.

 

 

Posa Ede, "Budapest," pastel, 19 11/16 x 23 5/8 in

Posa Ede, “Budapest,” pastel, 19 11/16 x 23 5/8 in

I had three pastels by Posa Ede to choose from! In the end I went with this painting, first because I love the bright colours used although it’s a night scene, the feeling of mist and wet streets with scurrying people, and the way the light is used in different ways – various buildings lit up from without and within- and second, because it’s a city we may visit in May. (My honey Cam and I are going to choose a city in Europe, one where we haven’t been, and stay for three weeks. We’ll both be working – he writing, me painting. Budapest is on the short list.) I love the combination of both the side of the pastel and the tip, ie. painting and drawing. I want to step into the painting and walk towards the light! See more of his work here.

 

 

Cameron Hampton, "Crouching Nude Study," Pastel on La Carte paper, 8 x 8 in

Cameron Hampton, “Crouching Nude Study,” Pastel on La Carte paper, 8 x 8 in

When I saw this pastel on the Pastel of America Facebook page, I was stopped in my tracks. Powerful, bold, unafraid, direct. I think of master artists like Lucian Freud (his later work) and Kathe Kollwitz when I look at this piece. Who is this woman? What is going on with her? Go check out more of Cameron’s work here!

 

 

Ellen Eagle, "Nude," pastel, 31 1/2 x 13 in

Ellen Eagle, “Nude,” pastel, 31 1/2 x 13 in

From the colourful expressionism of Hampton’s work, we go to the muted delicacy of this nude by Ellen Eagle. Legs together, we are presented with a completely different picture. Here there is contemplation and an ethereal quality. And yet, there is still emotion, of sorrow? of pain? There is something about this piece that reminds me of the work of Pierre-Paul Prud’hon. Go see more of Ellen’s work at her newly designed website!

 

 

Don Gardi, "Dialogue with the Ephemeral," pastel, 11 x 14 in

Don Gardi, “Dialogue with the Ephemeral,” pastel, 11 x 14 in

I love the exuberant mark-making Don Gardi brings to this piece. There’s energy and such fabulous colour. I feel excited just looking at it! It reminds me a lot of the work of Joan Mitchell, an artist I admire greatly. (Read a blog I wrote about her work here.) This pastel makes me happy to be alive 🙂  Check out more of Don’s work at his website.

 

 

Tom Christopher, "Tower Rock," pastel, 25 x 32 in

Tom Christopher, “Tower Rock,” pastel, 25 x 32 in

I can feel the coolness of the snow in the shadows and reach for those areas still lit by the setting (or is it rising?) sun. Haven’t you experienced that quality of light in nature? I love the contrast between the limited palette of reds and blues and between large areas of colour and expressive line. I also enjoy the effect Tom creates with a textured surface (marks created by brush strokes?). Check out more of Tom’s work here.

 

 

Karen Pettengill, "First Light," pastel, 14 x 11 in

Karen Pettengill, “First Light,” pastel, 14 x 11 in

I kept thinking that this painting was going to have to go, but, in the end, it ended up as one of my 10 pastel choices. There’s a powerful simplicity to it that haunts me. That intense light through the doorway, something mystical is happening. What is this place? The whole thing has an iconic feel about it. See more of Karen’s work here.

 

I’d love to hear what you think of my pastel choices for December!

 

And so endeth 2014.

Wishing you a most joyful, a most adventurous, a most peaceful, a most healthy, a most successful, a most exciting, a most fulfilling 2015!

From my heart, thank you for joining me on these pastel journeys. See you next year!!

~ Gail

 

Pastel Gems – November’s Choices

The Pastel Gems

It’s the end of November already and it’s time for another gathering of pastels that have wowed me over the past month. Extremely hard choices again this month especially with everyone posting their pieces accepted into the International Association of Pastel Societies (IAPS) Online show. (The show will available for viewing in December at this website.) Over and over the possibilities I went. Always hard to make the cuts but as I said back in September when I started this monthly feature, I’m keeping it to ten pastel gems only!

Okay, let’s go take a look.

 

A pastel gem - Andrew McDermott, Life drawing 30 min pose, pastel on kraft paper, approx 18 x 24 in

Andrew McDermott, Life drawing 30 min pose, pastel on kraft paper, approx 18 x 24 in

I only came across this masterful 30 minute pastel a couple of days ago. I love the deceptive simplicity of it. Look at the way Andy uses the warmth of the paper contrasted with that cool violet. Known more for his colourful landscape pastels than figure work, I’m delighted to see Andy’s beautiful life drawings that he posts from time to time on the Federation of Canadian Artists’ Facebook page. (Andy also happens to be President of the FCA.) To see more of Andy’s work, click here.

 

A pastel gem - Christine Obers, "Commissioned Portrait of Stephen Olmstead," Nupastel, Unison and pencils on Art Spectrum Colourfix paper, 10 x 8 in

Christine Obers, “Commissioned Portrait of Stephen Olmstead,” Nupastel, Unison and pencils on Art Spectrum Colourfix paper, 10 x 8 in

I was blown away by this sensitive and detailed portrait. I feel as if I could reach out and feel this man’s skin. One of the things I love is the reflected light on the shadowed side of the face which appears to have been created by leaving the warmth of the paper coming through. There is so much to appreciate about this portrait. I like the vignetting and Christine explained on her Facebook page why she decided on that look: “Aside from an aesthetic reason there is another reason I chose to do the portrait this way. The man in the portrait’s life was cut short in a cycling accident. His life was unfinished. This was a commission I did for his family.”

I have to say I was torn between this piece and a pastel Christine did of a sleeping dog called, “Sweet Dreams.” You can see that pastel and others on her website.

 

 

A pastel gem - Carlos Frey, "Portrait 1," Blue Earth pastels on Canson Mi-Tientes, 12 x 9

Carlos Frey, “Portrait 1,” Blue Earth pastels on Canson Mi-Tientes, 12 x 9 in

Powerful portrait! Did you notice that Carlos used only a limited palette of maybe seven colours plus the colour of the paper to express so much? The application of pastel is gutsy and straighforward, just getting down blocks of colour in a very strong understanding of value range. I will direct you to Carlos’s website here but I have to say that I was surprised to find a different look to his work there. If you check out his work on his Facebook profile, you’ll find work more similar to this one. Here, Carlos used pastels from the 21-colour Portrait and Figure Sampler set. His first time using Blue Earth pastels (I myself have never used this brand), this was his verdict: “My initial impression….VERY favourable.” Now I’m very curious!

 

 

A pastel gem - Anna Wainright, "Weather Change," pastel, 12 x 16 in

Anna Wainright, “Weather Change,” pastel, 12 x 16 in

An evocative painting of that certain quality of a day in winter, with cloud and shadow and sunlight peeking through. Imagine deciding to paint this scene. Really, there’s nothing there except road and bush in shadow, and a cloudy sky, but it’s the quality of light that evidently was the attraction and the message. Lovely. What’s really surprising is that I believe I read that Anna painted this from her imagination! If that’s the case, she certainly has considerable experience painting this kind of snow scene. I love how she’s caught the way snow clumps in a bush of many branches. The longer I look at this painting, the more I am reminded of the light in the paintings of Dutch landscape painter Jacob van Ruisdael (c.1629-1682). You can see more of Anna’s evocative work here.

 

 

A pastel gem - James Kasperek, "Winter Hillside," Sennelier pastels on black Richeson Unison sanded paper, 11 x 16 in

James Kasperek, “Winter Hillside,” Sennelier pastels on black Richeson Unison sanded paper, 11 x 16 in

Here’s another winter scene where dark and light values are dominant yet because of their extremes, we have a totally different feeling from Anna’s painting! I love the drama of the dark trees against the lightness of the snow. I also appreciate the saturation of colour throughout even though it’s mainly a ‘black and white’ picture. And look at that vigorous application of pastel! Yum! Check out more of James’s work here.

 

 

A pastel gem - Jeri Greenberg, "Dusk on the Dune," pastel on UArt400 paper, 7 x 11 in

Jeri Greenberg, “Dusk on the Dune,” pastel on UArt400 paper, 7 x 11 in

Dusk: a time of lessening light but not yet dark, a time of little shadow and little highlights and that means a smaller value range. Look how effectively Jeri has used purple over green to present the greying of colour that happens at that time of day. Her painting also shows how the simplest subject – a tree and space of land and sky – can create a painting that stops you in your tracks. Go see more of her work by clicking here.

 

 

A pastel gem - Christine Debrosky, "To The Clearing," pastel, 12 x 12 in

Christine Debrosky, “To The Clearing,” pastel, 12 x 12 in

I love the cool/warm feeling of this painting. Going from the value extremes of James’s piece and from the darker quality of Jeri’s end-of day-pastel, we see here a painting where the value range is small and hovers in the middle of the value scale. Even so, you can see, with deft attention to choice of colour, temperature, texture, and design, how beautiful small and subtle shifts in value can be in a painting. Christine’s painting begs the question: what will I find in the clearing? Light for sure and a mystical experience perhaps? See more of Christine’s work here.

 

 

A pastel gem - Lyn Asselta, "The Beach Ramp," pastel on Canson Touch paper, 12 x 12 in

Lyn Asselta, “The Beach Ramp,” pastel on Canson Touch paper, 12 x 12 in

And now we go from the cool shade of Christine’s painting to being out in the blazing sunshine. What impressed me most about Lyn’s pastel was her ability to take seemingly inconsequential details – part of a house, some  signs, a hill, a road, some bush – and make a beautiful and mysterious painting of them. Where is this place? Where is the road leading to? Why is there a barrier? What do the signs say? So many questions and so much story-making material. The title, of course, gives us a clue, but without it, the possibilities are endless. Check out more of Lyn’s work here.

 

 

A pastel gem - Lynn Harris Morgan, "Heaven and Earth," pastel on UArt 800 paper, 18 x 24 in

Lynn Harris Morgan, “Heaven and Earth,” pastel on UArt 800 paper, 18 x 24 in

I love the colours in Lynn’s pastel. I love how she takes the landscape and goes beyond it, abstracting it. Or should I say, she has taken abstract forms and seen and enhanced an emerging landscape. So is this an abstract or a landscape? Go check out more of Lynn’s work on her website.

 

 

A pastel gem - Rita Kirkman, "Wake Up Call," pastel, 7 x 5 in

Rita Kirkman, “Wake Up Call,” pastel, 7 x 5 in

This rooster reminds me so much of the cocky roosters I see when I visit Mexico. This pastel absolutely caught my eye! Look at all those colours captured in those fleshy wattles, in the interior of the beak, in the glint of the rooster’s eye. Wonderful!! Can’t you just hear him crowing?? Many of you will know Rita’s pastels of farm animals – rabbits, chickens, cows, goats, donkeys. You can see them and more of her work here.

 

 

I’d love to hear what you think of these pastel gems. As difficult as it is to make the choices for these blogs, I so enjoy bringing you my totally subjective and personal selections. It blows me away when I see the variety and expertise in pastels out there. Thanks to all of you for sharing your talents with us.

 

A reminder about my upcoming demo

Next Sunday, 7th December, I will be at the Opus Art store in Victoria from 11am to 1pm demoing a colourful still life in pastels. You will need to register if you’d like to attend. Click here to do so.

 

As always, lovely to have you along for the ride.

Until next time,

~ Gail

 

PS. 3 December 2014. I’ve just heard that Christine Obers won first prize in Pastel Artists Canada online exhibition. It was for her piece, “Sweet Dreams.” I deliberated for ages as to which piece to include in my pastel gems and eventually I chose the portrait. BUT since Christine won for the other piece, I have decided to include it here. Yay!

Pastel Gem - Christine Obers, "Sweet Dreams (Olive)," Nupastels, Unison, and pastel pencils on Art Spectrum Colourfix paper, 8 x 10 in,  created for a fundraiser for children's art programmes

Christine Obers, “Sweet Dreams (Olive),” Nupastels, Unison, and pastel pencils on Art Spectrum Colourfix paper, 8 x 10 in, created for a fundraiser for children’s art programmes

 

 

Pastel Gems: October’s Round-Up!

At the end of last month, I posted the first of these ‘pastel gems’ blogs. It was a very informal, totally personal selection of pastel gems that came across my computer screen through the month of September. It was so well received, I’ve decided to make it a monthly feature.

Last time I said I would keep my choices to only 10. Was I crazy???? That’s waaaaaaay too difficult! But yeah, I know, I promised.

One of the difficult things in choosing was liking pieces by artists already featured last month. Well, they had to go first. (Maybe in a couple of months I’ll permit myself to post their beautiful work again.) Others didn’t have complete information so I edited those out too (as much as I hated to do so). Then I looked and whittled, looked and whittled. Terrible to have to make these kind of choices. No envy of jurors that’s for sure (I’ve only had the pleasure of being a juror twice). So from 35 plus, here are my 10 pastel gems for this month. Like I say, purely subjective. My own delight really but I do hope you will come away with some awe and pleasure.

 

Let’s take a look.

 

Arlene Richman, Quick Study, pastel on BFK with pastel ground, 11 x 11 in

Arlene G. Richman, Quick study, pastel on prepared BFK Rives paper, 11 x 11 in

I love the simplicity, the colour combinations, and the design elements of this study. Arlene does these quick studies when she needs to keep the creative juices flowing. She started them because  she “was up against a wall vis a vis a more serious piece and … just needed to keep going and painting….. I start with a mark – either a color shape or a directional line or two – or both. Then the rest of the painting is an exercise in solving the problem I presented to myself. I usually feel viscerally whether a color or line is correct.” To see more of her work, click here.

 

 

Linda Dessaint, "The Secret Spot," pastel on Wallis paper, 12 x 9 in

Linda Dessaint, “The Secret Spot,” pastel on Wallis paper, 12 x 9 in

There’s such an immediacy and vibrancy about this pastel! It looks as if it’s done on location but I don’t know this for sure. Happily for Linda, it recently won the Terry Ludwig award at the Pastel Society of New Hampshire‘s National Juried Show (hanging until 30 November). Check out her other pastels on her website.

 

 

Ginger M. Urick, "Blue on Black #2," pastel, 19 x 19 in

Ginger M. Urick, “Blue on Black #2,” pastel, 19 x 19 in

Completely different from Linda’s pastel above (which makes me think ‘glorious day’), Ginger’s piece is moody and evocative of the power of nature. I’m in awe of her technique and ability to capture this moment in the sky. I couldn’t find a website for Ginger but found her Artist Facebook Page instead. I hope you’ll head on over and Like it!

 

 

Aline Ordman, New Mexico workshop demo, Terry Ludwig pastels on Colourfix paper, 9 x 12 in

Aline Ordman, New Mexico workshop demo, Terry Ludwig pastels on Colourfix paper, 9 x 12 in

Another glorious example of painting en plein air. Aline’s colour always astonishes me. And look at the simplicity – so much said with so little. Head on over to her website to see more of her fabulous work!!

 

 

Bonnie Paruch, "Algoma Shadows," pastel on sanded paper, 14 x 18 in

Bonnie Paruch, “Algoma Shadows,” pastel on sanded paper, 14 x 18 in

I love that Bonnie could make such a beautiful and bold painting out of this ordinary subject matter. Evidently so did the judges at the September Bold Brush competition who awarded her an Outstanding Pastel award. This painting is one of seven completed for a group invitational show at the Charles Allis Art Museum. The show runs until 11 January 2015. Check out more of Bonnie’s work here.

 

 Supapong Yuneyong, Portrait, pastel, 17 x 12 in

 Supapong Yuneyong, Portrait, pastel, 17 x 12 in

I was rather taken with the vigorous nature of this portrait and the way the artist captured this man’s personality. I could find neither a website or a Facebook Artist Page for Supapong Yuneyong but he is on facebook. Click here to see his page and learn a bit more about him.

 

 

Gisele Hurtaud, "Le Chapeau de Marjolaine," pastel on pastelcard, 13 x 13 in

Gisele Hurtaud, “Le Chapeau de Marjolaine,” pastel on pastelcard, 13 x 13 in

I found this portrait delightful – the smile about to crack open, the glance away, the smooth skin contrasted with the wooly hat, the curl of hair escaping, the warm pastel in her cheek and the background. To see more of Gisele’s work, check out her website.

 

 

Daggi Wallace, "Emergence," pastel, 28 x 13 inDaggi Wallace, “Emergence,” pastel, 28 x 13 in

Daggi does some amazing portrait and figurative work. This month, this was the pastel that caught my attention – the incredible realism of the head (with the water reflections above the eyes and the drips of water) contrasted with the abstract quality of water that still appears perfectly real in the whole. You can see part of Daggi’s painting process here. How does she get such detail???? Check out more of Daggi’s work on her website.

 

 

Leo Loomie, "The Red Booth," pastel on ersta paper on foamcore, 20 x 16 in

Leo Loomie, “The Red Booth,” pastel on ersta paper on foamcore, 20 x 16 in

I love the feel of this pastel – I could walk in and sit down and then be mesmerized with all the reflected goings-on as I listen to the juke box. This pastel is part of a body of work Leo is creating called the Americana series. There are some fabulous pieces and it was difficult to choose which to include. Unable to find a website for Leo, I did find his Artist Page on Facebook – click here and go Like his Page 🙂

 

 

Diane Rudnick Mann, "Silverware in Glass," pastel, 26 x 21 in

Diane Rudnick Mann, “Silverware in Glass,” pastel, 26 x 21 in

I had two of Diane’s pastels to choose from. I decided to go with this one since the other, “8 or 9 Glass Bowls,” (which just won First Place in Still Life category in the 2015 Pastel Journal 100 Competition!!) is on the front page of her website. Go check it out! I think this pastel is equally amazing. Not only am I stunned by what she was able to do with a handful of silver utensils , I am intrigued by the velvety blackness of the background. How did she achieve this??

 

So there are my ten pastel gems for October. Difficult choices!! But some pretty awesome work don’t you think?

I’d loooooove to hear from you!!

Off to drool over this work some more….

~ Gail

 

PS. Happy Halloween!!

Check out these adorable children’s pastels of pumpkins!

 

Pastel Gems: A Monthly Round-Up

I got thinking the other day (oh yeah!). While cruising around the web, I see so many inspiring, delightful, surprising, beautiful pastels done by artists working today. So, my plan is, at the end of each month, to share a few of the pastel gems that caught my eye. There will be many to choose from but I promise to keep the selection to 10 and under. That’s gonna be difficult I know!

So let’s get cracking! Remember to keep an eye on the sizes of these pastel gems.

 

Bruce A Gomez, "Punto Amada," plein air pastel on Arches 140lb CP w/c paper, 8 x 10 in. Bruce says he sands the tooth of the paper down using 80 grit sandpaper until it feels like suede. It apparently holds the pastel beautifully!
Bruce A Gomez, “Punto Amada,” plein air pastel on Arches 140lb CP w/c paper, 8 x 10 in. I can feel the cool of the shade and see the sparkle of sun glinting on the water. Bruce says he sands the tooth of the paper down using 80 grit sandpaper until it feels like suede. It apparently holds the pastel beautifully! Click here to see more work.

 

Barbara Newton, "Fond Memories," pastel, 7.5 x 7.5 in. This pastel recently won an award. Click here to read more.
Barbara Newton, “Fond Memories,” pastel, 7.5 x 7.5 in. Small and magical! This pastel recently won an award. Click here to read more.

 

Jude Tolar, "Wildflowers Dance," pastel on Ampersand pastelbord, 11 x 14 in
Jude Tolar, “Wildflowers Dance,” pastel on Ampersand pastelbord, 11 x 14 in. I love the simplicity of this pastel. It reminds me of one of Childe Hassam’s pastels seen in my previous blog. To see more of Jude’s work, click here.

 

Jacob Aguiar, "Untitled," pastel on UArt 500 paper, 12 x 16 in
Jacob Aguiar, “Untitled,” pastel on UArt 500 paper, 12 x 16 in. Aren’t these trees lovely? I wanted to put a link to Jacob’s website but I couldn’t find one…I guess because he works full-time as a naturopathic doctor! Really?? Wow that’s all I can say. You can find him on Facebook.

 

Tony Allain, "Towards Cable Bay," pastel on sanded paper, 18 x 18 in
Tony Allain, “Towards Cable Bay,” pastel on sanded paper, 18 x 18 in. I admire the way Tony puts down a stroke so confidently and then leaves it alone. His colours and compositions are always so powerful. Click here to go to Tony’s website.

 

Casey Klahn, "The French Moderists," pastel, oil bar and graphite on 100% rag paper, 11 x 9 in
Casey Klahn, “The French Moderists,” pastel, oil bar and graphite on 100% rag paper, 11 x 9 in. I love this piece. I’m not sure why. There’s something about the colour, the texture, the content, that keeps me looking. It reminds me of still life paintings by Giorgio Morandi. Click here to see more about this painting.

 

Catherine Meeks, "Sunlight and Shower," pastel on pastelboard, 16 x 10 in
Catherine Meeks, “Sunlight and Shower,” pastel on pastelboard, 16 x 10 in. I am delighted by the colour, lightness, and abstract quality of this pastel. Click here to go to Catherine’s blog.

 

Ruth Mann, "Girl in Pink," pastel on Fisher 400, 16 x 12 in
Ruth Mann, “Girl in Pink,” pastel on Fisher 400, 16 x 12 in. Look at all those colours in there!! To see more of Ruth’s work, click here.

 

Joni Beinborn, "Bertha," pastel on pastelmat, 26 x 19 in
Joni Beinborn, “Bertha,” pastel on pastelmat, 26 x 19 in. I have to say I am generally not a big fan of animal art but this blew me away! To see more of Joni’s equine work, click here.

 

 

Janet A Cook, "Thread of Flight," pastel, 40 x 43 in
Janet A Cook, “Thread of Flight,” pastel, 40 x 43 in.
[Updated July 2016 for the Pratiques des Arts feature on my blog – This painting by Janet Cook is a combination of realism and fantasy. We easily recognize the figure of a young woman and the dove, yet the position of the girl suspended in midair and her connection with the dove are in the realm of metaphor and surrealism. With this primarily blue over reddish purple pastel painting, Cook gives us not only a luscious and textural piece to enjoy visually but also one that stimulates our interpretive capacity – how do we, the viewer, read what’s being said? The figure is so beautifully rendered and sits so well in this magical piece.] To see more of Janet Cook’s work, click here. This painting won an award in the Pastel Society of America’s 42nd Annual exhibition.

 

So that’s the first edition of my blogs on pastel gems found on my internet travels. What did you think of the pastels? What do you think of this monthly sharing? Helpful? Valuable?

Please let me know by commenting on this blog. (To do this, click on the title of the blog which will take you to the post on my website. Scroll to the bottom of the blog post and write your comment there. Then you’ll need to “Verify your real existence” by following the Captcha instructions. Once you’ve done that, remember to click the Post Comment button!! Whew! OR you can reply directly to me and I’ll manually post the comment to the blog for you.)

 

Until next time,

~ Gail