Painting an Eggplant: Gail Sibley, "Eggplant and Garlic," Mount Vision pastels on UArt 400 grit paper, 6 x 11 in

Painting An Eggplant And Garlic

I couldn’t decide what to paint for my next video demo until I saw a big beautiful eggplant (aubergine) in the market calling out to be painted! So I created a video on the complexities of painting an eggplant. Have a look.

Here’s the ‘Painting an Eggplant’ Video

 

 

This is a photograph of the setup. A reminder though – I always try to work from life. And I worked from life for this video. When I look at the photo, all the subtle colour changes that I saw in the luscious skin of the eggplant are missing as are all the other colours I saw.

Painting An Eggplant: photo of set-up

Photo of the set-up

Painting an Eggplant: the set up shown in black and white

The set up shown in black and white

 

Painting an Eggplant: My thumbnail sketches

My thumbnail sketches. You can see how I changed the angle of the eggplant in the second sketch.

 

Painting an Eggplant - the initial sketch in vine charcoal on UArt 400 grit paper

The initial sketch in vine charcoal on UArt 400 grit paper

And I’m off to the races!!

As you saw in the video, I spent time building up layers of colours especially on the eggplant. I had trouble getting the darkness right and balancing that darkness with colour. An interesting exercise for sure.

This demo took about an hour rather than the usual 35 mins or so. This was partly due to the increased size (from a 6 x 6 in square to a 6 x 11 in piece of paper) but also due to the complexity of colour I wanted to achieve while retaining the correct value structure.

I did use a limited palette but, because 50 pastels (Mount Vision’s workshop set) is more than I usually have to choose from, I found myself picking out more colours than I might have done with a smaller set.

Here are the pastels I used:

Painting an Eggplant: The limited palette of Mount Vision soft pastels used in the painting

The limited palette of Mount Vision soft pastels used in the painting

 

Painting an Eggplant: Gail Sibley, "Eggplant and Garlic," Mount Vision pastels on UArt 400 grit paper, 6 x 11 in

Gail Sibley, “Eggplant and Garlic,” Mount Vision pastels on UArt 400 grit paper, 6 x 11 in

Painting an Eggplant: Gail Sibley, "Eggplant and Garlic," Mount Vision pastels on UArt 400 grit paper, 6 x 11 in- in bxw

Gail Sibley, “Eggplant and Garlic,” Mount Vision pastels on UArt 400 grit paper, 6 x 11 in- in black and white

 

Have you ever painted an eggplant? Are you friend or foe with this vegetable. I’d LOVE to hear from you so why not leave a comment?!

Until next time,

~ Gail

 

 

12 thoughts on “Painting An Eggplant And Garlic

  1. Takeyce Walter

    Lovely! Thanks for sharing your process. I love the brilliant yellow, and the way you pulled that note into the reflection on the eggplant. Yes, I have painted one paired with a lemon once. Loved capturing the deep dark eggplant color and sheen.

    Reply
    1. Gail Sibley Post author

      Thanks Takeyce! Interesting how we both went with a yellow colour to contrast with the darkness and purpleness of the eggplant.

      Reply
  2. Kerry

    I have just watched this great video for the second time: I do love watching your process and the way the image comes to life. I wish I didn’t seem to always get mud though when I try layering this many colours!

    Thank you for spending the time putting these videos together. It is very much appreciated. 🙂

    Reply
    1. Gail Sibley Post author

      Thanks Kerry for your kind words AND for watching my video more than once 🙂
      Are you using a sanded paper? They can take many more layers than say Canson Mi-Teintes. Also, as you see, I never blend (with fingers or tools) and that helps keep ‘mud’ at bay. A gentle pressure also helps!

      Reply
      1. Kerry

        In the main I use Pastelmat – I didn’t like the Canson Mi-Teintes. It is probably my technique rather than paper! I probably press too hard.

        I think I have watched most of your videos more than once since I first came across you. 🙂

        Reply
        1. Gail Sibley Post author

          Yes, pressure is sooooooo important!! Try a lighter hand.
          Thanks for being an enthusiastic video watcher 🙂

  3. Shauna

    Finally got around to trying this after watching the demo again. Very pleased with the result. The hardest part is deciding when it’s finished and stepping back! Thank you for the inspiration .

    Reply

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